Original Publication
Open Access

Enhancing Behavioral and Social Science at the Bedside: Core Skills for Clinicians and Teachers

Published: February 20, 2015 | 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10032

Included in this publication:

  • Instructor's Guide.docx
  • Faculty Development Workshop.pptx
  • Role-Play Scripts.docx
  • Evaluation Form.docx
  • Participants' Handout.doc

To view all publication components, extract (i.e., unzip) them from the downloaded .zip file.


Editor's Note: This publication predates our implementation of the Educational Summary Report in 2016 and thus displays a different format than newer publications.

Abstract

The curriculum consists of an interactive 120-minute workshop used to train faculty on how to best incorporate social and behavioral science (SBS) constructs at the bedside to improve clinical care and teaching. During this workshop, participants collectively identify, rank, and apply SBS clinical pearls to two role-played scenarios derived from clinical inpatient ward round encounters. This publication includes all materials needed to implement the workshop including: a facilitator's guide, workshop slides, a script for each role play scenario, workshop evaluation form, and a handout for participants.

This workshop was delivered to internal medicine and pediatric hospitalist groups at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in June of 2012 and Stanford University School of Medicine in September of 2012. This workshop was later presented at the Association of American Medical Colleges Annual Conference in San Francisco, California in November of 2012. While the latter two groups were not evaluated, workshop participants at UCSF were surveyed. Participants (N = 8) rated the overall quality of the workshop an average of 4.43 (SD = 0.79) on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = Poor 5 = Excellent). The quality of teaching, usefulness of written materials, and likelihood that changes will be made in the participants’ teaching/professional practices as a result of this CME workshop had mean ratings of 4.38 (SD = 1.06), 4.13 (SD = 0.99), and 4.25 (SD = 1.04), respectively.

In retrospect, administering more evaluations would have provided additional insight into the strengths and weaknesses of this curriculum. Regardless, our results indicate that the overall quality of the workshop remains high. The “quality of written materials” received the lowest marks but have since been improved upon. Teaching quality varies by instructor and, based on our experience, generally improves with each additional workshop. Ultimately, the evaluation results indicate that there is great potential for this curriculum to impact change in everyday clinical practices.


Educational Objectives

By the end of this session, learners should be able to:

  1. Describe common social and behavioral science (SBS) constructs and describe their role in the provision of optimal patient care.
  2. Apply SBS concepts to learner-centered teaching and patient-centered care.
  3. Generate a list of three to five strategies that can be used to integrate SBS concepts into participants’ own clinical care and teaching.

Author Information

  • Jacqueline Ramos: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Alyssa Bogetz: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Erika Schillinger: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Sylvia Bereknyei Merrell, DrPH, MS: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Rebecca Blankenburg: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Sara Buckelew, MD, MPH: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Huiju Chen, MD, MSEd: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Stephanie Harman: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Bradley Monash: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Stephanie Rennke, MD: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Patrick Yuan: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • Clarence Braddock, MD: Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Jason Satterfield: University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine

Disclosures
None to report.

Funding/Support
None to report.

Prior Presentations
Satterfield J, Braddock CH, Monash B, Blankenberg R. Enhancing behavioral and social science teaching at the bedside: Core skills for clinicians and teachers. Workshop presented at: Association of American Medical Colleges Annual Meeting; November 2012; San Francisco, CA.



Citation

Ramos J, Bogetz A, Schillinger E, et al. Enhancing behavioral and social science at the bedside: core skills for clinicians and teachers. MedEdPORTAL. 2015;11:10032. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10032