Original Publication
Open Access

Using a Standardized Patient to Counsel on a New Prescription for Atorvastatin

Published: October 27, 2015 | 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10257

Included in this publication:

  • Atorvastatin Instructor's Guide.docx
  • Atorvastatin Resource File.pdf

To view all publication components, extract (i.e., unzip) them from the downloaded .zip file.


Editor's Note: This publication predates our implementation of the Educational Summary Report in 2016 and thus displays a different format than newer publications.

Abstract

Introduction: The case was developed to allow medical, nursing, or pharmacy students to apply the knowledge learned in a pharmacology course regarding the use of statins after a myocardial infarction. Often students do not see the value of basic science and overlook this material in order to get to the application of diagnosing and treating patient. In order to provide a bridge between didactic and experiential learning, this simulated patient case was created to let students practice being the provider while applying the knowledge learned in a pharmacology course. Methods: Using a standardized patient in a real-life scenario, learners will counsel an inquisitive and educated patient on statin indication, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and drug/food interactions. Materials provided include student case, standardized patient instructions, and a dichotomous performance checklist. A postsession evaluation incorporating Likert scale responses (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) assessed students’ perceptions of the experience. Perceptions were evaluated using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation). Results: The materials have been used on 119 second-year pharmacy students enrolled in a pharmacology course. The activity was administered in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Clinical Skills Center. Students effectively addressed both skills and communications portions of the checklists with performance averages of 70.3% and 86.9%, respectively. The postsession survey was completed by 116 students reporting that the exercise stimulated learning (M = 4.09, SD = 0.97), was stressful (M = 3.22, SD = 1.05), was organized (M = 4.48, SD = 0.78), was challenging (M = 3.49, SD = 0.89), and was useful (M = 4.40, SD = 0.66). All (100%) students agreed simulation should be used next year in this course. Discussion: Students perceived the patient encounter to be useful to learning and recommended it be incorporated in future coursework. Implementation of clinical exercises mimicking actual patient encounters should be considered in basic pharmaceutical sciences courses to enhance application of foundational knowledge. This case reinforced the ideas that standardized patient training is very important to ensure accuracy, and student input on case development is beneficial.


Educational Objectives

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  1. Counsel a patient on statin indication, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and drug/food interactions.
  2. Apply the knowledge learned in a pharmacology course regarding the use of statins after a myocardial infarction.
  3. Effectively communicate with a patient regarding new prescription counseling.

Author Information

  • Ashley Castleberry, PharmD, MAEd: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Catie Renna: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Andrea Tedder, PharmD: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Jordan Rowe: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Joseph Warren: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Rose Pennick: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine

Disclosures
None to report.

Funding/Support
None to report.


References

  1. Clinically significant statin drug interactions. Pharmacist’s Letter. 2012;28(6):280606.
  2. Khanna D, Khanna PP, Fitzgerald JD, et al. 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part2: therapy and antiinflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. Arthritis Care Res. 2012;64(10):1447-1461. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.21773
  3. Potential drug interactions with grapefruit. Pharmacist’s Letter. 2013;29(1):290101.
  4. Stone NJ, Robinson JG, Lichtenstein AH, et al. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63(25, pt B):2889-2934. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2013.11.002 


Citation

Castleberry A, Renna C, Tedder A, Rowe J, Warren J, Pennick R. Using a standardized patient to counsel on a new prescription for Atorvastatin. MedEdPORTAL. 2015;11:10257. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10257