Teaching Residents Clinical Practice Guidelines Using a Flipped Classroom Model

Publication ID Published Volume
10548 March 6, 2017 13

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Stanford University School of Medicine

Abstract

Introduction: Prior studies have demonstrated poor guideline compliance by pediatricians, and there is no published curriculum on how to teach clinical guidelines. Furthermore, in a national survey of pediatric residency training programs conducted in 2015, only two had a formal curriculum for teaching clinical guidelines. This module provides a framework for teaching residents clinical guidelines through a modified flipped classroom approach. Associated materials include a guide for faculty facilitators, sample slides and worksheet, and pictures of the classroom setup. Methods: In this module, the guidelines for acute otitis media (AOM), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are taught in three sessions and evaluated with a pre-/posttest assessing knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and satisfaction. Each guideline is delivered in a 30-minute session, with five learners per group. Faculty training requires approximately 30 minutes of preparation. The intervention groups (n = 9 for OSAS, 10 each for AOM and ADHD) received three weekly, half-hour flipped classroom lessons. The control group (n = 19) had no formal guideline education. Results: Pre-/posttests showed a statistically significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes in the group of interns who received this educational intervention over the control group. The learners rated the sessions as highly effective. Discussion: This module provides an efficient and effective way of utilizing a modified flipped classroom approach to teach learners the correct use of clinical guidelines, a skill residents must master to provide evidence-based care. This curriculum has been successfully incorporated into our pediatric residency program.

Citation

Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. Teaching residents clinical practice guidelines using a flipped classroom model. MedEdPORTAL Publications. 2017;13:10549. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10549

Educational Objectives

By the end of this module, learners will be able to:

  1. Discuss one key action statement in a clinical practice guideline for acute otitis media (AOM), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  2. Describe one relevant clinical example for their assigned key action statement.
  3. Teach back a minimum of one key point of the key action statement to their small group.
  4. Create a diagnostic or treatment algorithm for the management of AOM, OSAS, and ADHD using relevant clinical practice guidelines.

Keywords

  • Resident Education, Small-Group Learning, Clinical Practice Guidelines, Flipped Classroom, Editor's Choice

Prior Scholarly Dissemination

  1. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. A “flipped classroom” model: teaching interns clinical guidelines. Poster presented at: Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting; April 30-May 3, 2016; Baltimore, MD.

  2. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. A “flipped classroom” model: teaching interns clinical guidelines. Poster presented at: Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford Research Day; April 2016; Palo Alto, CA.

  3. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. A “flipped classroom” model: teaching interns clinical guidelines. Poster presented at: Association of Pediatric Program Directors Annual Spring Meeting; March 30-April 2, 2016; New Orleans, LA.

  4. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. Teaching residents clinical practice guidelines using a flipped classroom. Presented at: Pediatric Grand Rounds at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; June 2016; Palo Alto, CA.

  5. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. Teaching residents clinical practice guidelines using a flipped classroom. Presented at: Pediatric Grand Rounds at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center; June 2016; San Jose, CA.

  6. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. A “flipped classroom” model: teaching interns clinical guidelines. Presented at: APA Education Committee Meeting at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting; April 30-May 3, 2016; Baltimore, MD.

  7. Peterson J, Louden DT, Gribben V, Blankenburg R. A “flipped classroom” model: teaching interns clinical guidelines. Presented at: Chief Resident Forum at the Association of Pediatric Program Directors Annual Spring Meeting; March 30-April 2, 2016; New Orleans, LA.

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