Patient Safety Interprofessional Training for Medical, Nursing, and Pharmacy Students

Publication ID Published Volume
10595 June 15, 2017 13

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Abstract

Introduction: Patient safety education is required in medical, nursing, and pharmacy training, and interprofessional education offers an ideal format for teaching the core concepts of patient safety. This training activity was developed to fulfill interprofessional education core competencies for communication and teamwork and was nested within a required patient safety course taught at a medical school. However, the activity can easily be adapted as a stand-alone offering that can be included in a preclinical doctoring course, offered as an elective, or hosted at a college of nursing or pharmacy. Our goal was to prepare learners for the clinical environment by providing a context for patient safety, communication, and teamwork. Methods: Students participate in a 1.5-hour large-group activity that explores a case from the perspectives of each discipline. Faculty from all three disciplines sequentially present and debrief the case using focused questions to guide students’ reflections and interactions between team members. Results: We have presented this activity for 4 consecutive years. Students complete a questionnaire with retrospective pre-post ratings of their perspectives on the activity and its impact on their awareness of disciplinary roles and responsibilities, communication errors, and strategies for addressing interdisciplinary conflicts. Results show statistically significant increases in the items of interest. Discussion: This interprofessional education offering is effective in terms of increasing awareness and knowledge among members of three health care disciplines, improving awareness of potential kinds of communication errors, and helping students consider the role of interdisciplinary interactions.

Citation

Gill AC, Cowart JB, Hatfield CL, et al. Patient safety interprofessional training for medical, nursing, and pharmacy students. MedEdPORTAL Publications. 2017;13:10595. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10595

Educational Objectives

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Communicate information with patients, families, community members, and health team members in a form that is understandable and avoids discipline-specific terminology when possible.
  2. Listen actively and encourage ideas and opinions of other team members.
  3. Recognize how their own uniqueness (experience level, expertise, culture, power, and hierarchy within the health team) contributes to effective communication, conflict resolution, and positive interprofessional working relationships.
  4. Communicate the importance of teamwork in patient-centered care and population health programs and policies.

Keywords

  • Interprofessional Education, Patient Safety, Teamwork, Communication

References

  1. Danielson J, Moore M, O’Connor S, et al. Coordinating care across settings: roles and responsibilities in the primary care clinic (IPE training module for students). MedEdPORTAL Publications. 2015;11:10295. http://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10295

  2. Gill AC. Relationship centered transformation of curricula: interprofessional education. Presented at: Integrating Behavioral and Social Sciences Into Healthcare Education Workshop; April 22, 2016; Bethesda, MD.

  3. Gill AC, Nelson EA, Cowart JB, Hatfield CL, Dello Stritto RA, Teal CR. Interprofessional education: a novel method of introducing patient safety concepts early in preclinical training. Poster presented at: Moving up the Educational Ladder—Improving Your Skills and Building Your Career in Medical Education; February 7, 2014; Houston, TX.

  4. Gill AC, Nelson EA, Cowart JB, Hatfield CL, Dello Stritto RA, Teal CR. Interprofessional education: a novel method of introducing patient safety concepts early in preclinical training. Poster presented at: Baylor College of Medicine Annual Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Conference; May 15, 2014; Houston, TX.

  5. Gill AC, Nelson E, Hatfield C, Dello Stritto R, Landrum P, Teal CR. Interprofessional patient safety education in the preclinical curriculum. Presented at: Association of American Medical Colleges Medical Education Meeting; November 11, 2015; Baltimore, MD.

  6. Gill AC, Nelson E, Hatfield C, Dello Stritto R, Landrum P, Teal CR. Interprofessional patient safety education in the preclinical curriculum. Presented at: GME-Macy Foundation Summit: Developing an Innovative Blueprint to Address Training and Retention of Rural Practitioners, Mental Health Issues, and Interprofessional Education; February 17, 2016; Houston, TX.

  7. Health Professions Network Nursing and Midwifery Office. Framework for action on interprofessional education & collaborative practice. World Health Organization Web site. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/70185/1/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf?ua=1. Published 2010.

  8. Institute of Medicine Committee on the Health Professions Education Summit. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2003.

  9. Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: Report of an Expert Panel. Washington, DC: Interprofessional Education Collaborative; 2011.

  10. McClaskey EM, Michalets EL. Subdural hematoma after a fall in an elderly patient taking high-dose omega-3 fatty acids with warfarin and aspirin: case report and review of the literature. Pharmacotherapy. 2007;27(1):152-160. https://doi.org/10.1592/phco.27.1.152

  11. TeamSTEPPS. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Web site. https://www.ahrq.gov/teamstepps/index.html. Accessed January 6, 2017.

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ISSN 2374-8265