Original Publication
Open Access

Training Guide for Standardized Patient Instructors to Teach Medical Students Culturally Competent Tobacco Cessation Counseling

Published: February 26, 2008 | 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.762

Included in this publication:

  • Cover Page
  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Chapter 4
  • Chapter 5
  • Andrea M.doc
  • Charles R.doc
  • Daphine L.doc

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Editor's Note: This publication predates our implementation of the Educational Summary Report in 2016 and thus displays a different format than newer publications.

Abstract

Introduction: This module was designed to serve as a toolkit for health care educators interested in training lay persons to serve as tobacco-using standardized patient instructors (SPIs). The curriculum has been applied in undergraduate medical education, but could easily be adopted in physician assistant programs, nursing schools, and residency programs. Methods: This module is divided into three parts, expected to be completed within three, half-day training sessions. Chapters one through three of this module correspond to the curriculum content to be delivered. These chapters are titled: Introduction to Tobacco Cessation Counseling, Recognizing and Evaluating Culturally Competent Tobacco Cessation Counseling, and Providing feedback on Tobacco Cessation and Recognizing Culturally Competent Counseling, respectively.  Chapter four, titled Observation of an SPI Encounter, may occur within the three days or be offered on another day while Chapter 5: Standard Forms, provides additional training materials. It is recommended that the comprehensive training program be fully undertaken to achieve the full value of the curriculum content. Results: The significance of this work and the reliability of the training were published (Foley KL, George G, Crandall SJ, Walker KH, Marion GS, Spangler JG. Training and evaluating tobacco-specific standardized patient instructors. Fam Med. 2006;38(1):28-37). The results showed that "SPIs highly rated the content, organization, and presenters of the training program. Medical students positively evaluated their experience with the SPIs. The [Tobacco Intervention Risk Factor Interview Scale] TIRFIS and [Tobacco Beliefs Management Scale-Tobacco Cultural Concerns Scale] TBMS-TCCS subscales demonstrated good internal reliability and inconsistencies in ratings by different SPIs were minimal. In addition, a range of scores on both measures attest to the sensitivity of the instruments to assess variations in student performance. Significant start-up costs are associated with developing this training program, although costs decline when SPIs are retained long term. The SPI training program was effective in developing a cohort of knowledgeable and reliable SPIs to train medical students in ways to improve their tobacco intervention counseling skills." Discussion: The module was designed to serve as a toolkit for health care educators interested in training lay persons to serve as tobacco-using SPIs. The curriculum has been applied in undergraduate medical education, but could easily be adopted in physician assistant programs, nursing schools, and residency programs. It is recommended that the comprehensive training program be fully undertaken to achieve the full value of the curriculum content.


Educational Objectives

By the end of this session, learners will be able to:

  1. Describe basic epidemiology of tobacco prevalence and health effects of tobacco use.
  2. Articulate pharmacotherapy treatment options for nicotine dependence.
  3. Describe the Stages of Change model and its application to tobacco cessation counseling.
  4. Raise awareness among standardized patient instructors about the role tobacco has played in their own lives.
  5. Reliably apply the scoring algorithms using the guide and behavioral indicators.
  6. Appreciate the role that culture plays on tobacco use/dependence.
  7. Identify disparities in tobacco use/dependence among various subgroups.
  8. Reliably evaluate students' cultural counseling skills using the Tobacco Beliefs and Management Scale and the Tobacco Cultural Concerns Scale.
  9. Learn how to provide constructive feedback to the health care student.

Author Information

  • Sonia Crandall, PhD, MS: Wake Forest School of Medicine of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
  • Kristie Long Foley, PhD: Davidson College
  • Gail Marion, PA, PhD: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • Donna Kronner: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • Kathy Walker: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • Karen Vaden: Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • John Spangler, MD, MPH: Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Disclosures
None to report.

Funding/Support
None to report.



Citation

Crandall S, Long Foley K, Marion G, et al. Training guide for standardized patient instructors to teach medical students culturally competent tobacco cessation counseling. MedEdPORTAL. 2008;4:762. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.762