Original Publication
Open Access

Blood Glucose Laboratory: Collective Experiences at Three US Medical Schools

Published: December 4, 2014 | 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.9978

Included in this publication:

  • Introduction and Explanation of Resource (READ ME FIRST).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Module Instructor Guide.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Schedule & Instructions.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Consent Form.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Permanent Record Form.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Tear-Off Time Sheet.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Real Time Data Template.xlsx
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Results.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Ice Breaker (Students).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Ice Breaker (Instructor).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Breakfast Nutrient Contents.xlsx
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Hospital Menu.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Menu Role Playing (Students).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Menu Role Playing (Instructor).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Cases.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Case Study Framing (Dietitian-In-Training).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Case Study Framing (Physician-In-Training).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Case Study (Students).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab IPE Case Study (Instructor).pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Who Wants to be a Millionaire Questions & Answer Key.pdf
  • OUWB 2014 Blood Glucose Lab Evaluation.pdf
  • Basic Procedure For Blood Glucose Determination.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Module Instructor Guide.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Pre-Class Breakfast Choices Survey.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Required Materials.pdf
  • Utah 2012 Blood Glucose Lab Schedule.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Data Recording Sheet.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Metabolic Regulation Worksheet.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Diabetes Case 1.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Diabetes Case 1 Answers.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Diabetes Case 2.pdf
  • Utah Blood Glucose Lab Diabetes Case 2 Answers.pdf
  • Utah 2012 Blood Glucose Lab Results.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Module Instructor Guide.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Schedule and Instructions.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Consent Form.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Menu.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Daily Food Diary.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Permanent Record Form.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Schedule Time Sheets.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Real Time Excel Spreadsheet With Representative Results.xlsx
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Nutrition Session Outline.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Nutrition Session Materials.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Pre-Test.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Post-Test.pdf
  • MCW Blood Glucose Lab Evaluation Data Example.pdf

To view all publication components, extract (i.e., unzip) them from the downloaded .zip file.


Editor's Note: This publication predates our implementation of the Educational Summary Report in 2016 and thus displays a different format than newer publications.

Abstract

This Blood Glucose Laboratory was originally conceived and implemented at the Medical College of Wisconsin over 20 years ago as a learner-centered and patient-centered activity. More recently, the University of Utah School of Medicine (2009) and the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine (2012) have adopted similar exercises. Therefore, rather than doing so separately, the authors decided to collaborate on this publication to include the collective experience, and three complete versions of a blood glucose laboratory for end users who may be interested in adopting a similar activity into their institutional curricula. The central activity of this half-day laboratory involves having learners determine their fasting blood glucose levels, followed by additional determinations at specified times after eating different breakfast meals. Real time display in the form of graphs showing the various aggregate profiles for each breakfast meal is a powerful way to demonstrate the effects of diet on blood glucose levels. Collectively, our breakfast menus are designed to illustrate the effects of a high glycemic index (high in glucose), high fiber, high fat, and no carbohydrates with high fat (based on the Atkins diet). However, each institution has adopted variations on this theme for their specific groups of learners, with somewhat different learning objectives, and activities interspersed between the post-prandial blood glucose determinations that help keep learners actively engaged during the entire laboratory session. Learner satisfaction has been high at all three institutions.


Educational Objectives

By the end of this session at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, learners will be able to:

  1. Discuss the impact of dietary intake on the treatment and management of diabetes mellitus.
  2. Describe the types of diabetes mellitus and the role nutrition plays with each.
  3. List the major macronutrients in the human diet and how these affect blood glucose.
  4. Assess simple nutritional status using anthropometrics, dietary, clinical, and laboratory means.
  5. Determine energy and nutrient requirements for individuals with diabetes.
  6. Develop general dietary recommendations for people with diabetes.
  7. Demonstrate how to use a glucometer to determine a blood glucose level.
  8. Appreciate the daily barriers of adhering to a nutritional prescription and other tasks related to diabetes self-management.
  9. Effectively communicate dietary recommendations to people with diabetes with sensitivity and respect.

By the end of this session at University of Utah School of Medicine, learners will be able to:

  1. Visualize postprandial changes in blood glucose levels after consuming different amounts of fat, sugar, and protein.
  2. Experience the process of regularly testing blood glucose levels, similar to that done by diabetics on a daily basis.
  3. Explain the mechanistic basis of blood glucose control in healthy individuals.
  4. Describe why blood glucose is elevated in people with diabetes.
  5. Identify roles of the Physician and Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetic Educator in diabetes care.
  6. Discuss nutritional concepts in the prevention of Type II diabetes and in the care of people with diabetes.
  7. Describe symptoms and long-term consequences of Type I and Type II diabetes.

By the end of this session at Medical College of Wisconsin, learners will be able to:

  1. Define the relationship between blood glucose and diet and how to control blood glucose levels by diet and exercise.
  2. Explain nutritional concepts applicable to normal individuals and those used in diabetes care including portion size and choices of food.
  3. Describe components of patients’ self-care including glucose measurement, diet, activity and use of medications.
  4. Explain the meaning of BMI, how it is calculated, and how it is used in advising patients.
  5. Compare Type I and Type II diabetes including symptoms, the medications required for each, and the biochemical pathways that differ.
  6. Describe the long term complications of diabetes and the biochemical changes that cause these complications.
  7. Compare the roles of the Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetic Educator in diabetes care.
  8. Define the role of the Primary Care Physician in diabetes care.

Author Information

  • Richard Sabina, PhD: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • Virginia Uhley: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • Barbara Main: Beaumont Health System
  • Victoria Lucia: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • Janet Lindsley: University of Utah School of Medicine
  • Karly Pippitt: University of Utah School of Medicine
  • David Morton: University of Utah School of Medicine
  • Sally Twining: Medical College of Wisconsin
  • Nancy Havas: Medical College of Wisconsin

Disclosures
None to report.

Funding/Support
None to report.



Citation

Sabina R, Uhley V, Main B, et al. Blood glucose laboratory: collective experiences at three US medical schools. MedEdPORTAL. 2014;10:9978. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.9978